Awesome Quotes – Today/Now

AWESOME QUOTESWelcome to a brand new set of Awesome Quotes. For a change, it’s not a Friday thing.

This week’s theme is today, or the here and now.

I recently participated in a 7-day camp at The Yoga Institute at Santacruz, Mumbai and am enrolled at a teacher’s training course at the same place (I’ve spoken about this earlier, here and here). A big lesson I have learnt there thus far, is to stay in the present. To consciously be where I am, whatever I am doing, with whoever I am. I have realised I have rarely done that in quite some time now.

Tap into your thoughts at any given point of time. Our mind is very fast. Most normal events are too slow or not sufficiently stimulative for it to be completely engaged with those tasks, and it wanders. We are either fretting over the past, the could-have and should-have-beens, or worrying over the future, what is yet to be. Neither is wrong or bad, just know that either way, it shall bear you no fruits, material or otherwise. You cannot change what happened in the past by worrying about it, and you cannot ever know what is going to happen the next second by breaking a sweat over that. Yes, you can learn from what has already transpired, you can maybe even make amends for your errors but worrying or fretting will only waste your time and worse, make you negative.

Therefore, the only thing that will keep our mind steady is to be in the moment and take things as they come, while understanding the consequences of the decisions we make while in the moment. We are being mindful.

With that in mind, I’ve got a few quotes about the ideas and concepts that ‘living in the present’ encompasses. Please, enjoy the now!


“Just for today, I will try to live through this day only, and not tackle my whole life problem at once.

Just for today I will be happy.”

— Kenneth L. Holmes

Let’s all try to live in the now just for today, and see how it goes.

“The future is not yet ours; perhaps it never will be. It is exposing ourselves to temptation to wish to anticipate God, and to prepare ourselves for things which he may not destine for us. Let us give heed to the present, whose duties are pressing; it is fidelity to the present which prepares us for fidelity in the future.”

— Francois Fenelon

I find this to be put very articulately and aptly.

“Yesterday is but a Dream,
And Tomorrow is only a Vision:
But Today well-lived makes
Every Yesterday a Dream of Happiness,
And every Tomorrow a Vision of Hope.”

— Translated from Sanskrit

Live today well. Look forward to living tomorrow well.

“Finish every day and be done with it. You have done what you could. Some blunders and absurdities no doubt crept in. Tomorrow is a new day. This day is all that is good and fair. It is too dear, with it’s hopes and invitations,to waste a moment on yesterdays.”

— Ralph Waldo Emerson

Learn and move on.

“We are all dreaming of some magical rose garden over the horizon – instead of enjoying the roses that are blooming outside our windows today.”

— Dale Carnegie

Live a little. Don’t procrastinate on that shit.

“Only that day dawns to which we are awake.”

— Thoreau

This one’s deep.

“Happiness is here and now.”

–Thich Nhat Hanh, 1926

If you want to be happy, be happy now. Happiness isn’t a place to get to, its a way of travelling.

“Ordinary people merely think how they shall spend their time; a man of talent tries to use it.”

— Arthur Schopenhauer

Use thy time.

“Time is not a line, but a series of now points.”

— Taisen Deshimaru

Make all the use of the now, so you won’t have to complain on its scarcity later.


Aaaaand that’s all I have for this week’s Awesome Quotes! I hope you guys enjoyed.

I’ll see you next time, when I’ll be back with some more Awesome Quotes.

Carpe diem.

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New Beginnings

All of us lead certain distinctive kinds of lifestyles. It begins when we are very young. We fall into categories, and usually just keep going deeper into them. Habits and patterns form. These turn into mechanical behaviour, more or less. Many don’t realise it. Those that do, find it difficult to reverse. Impossible, we say. “Nothing’s impossible!” our mind screams out in despair. That’s usually where 90% of the optimism gets drained.

A very few of us are fortunate enough to have a light thrown at us, and have somebody tell us that indeed, nothing’s impossible. Nothing. There are other ways to live. Better ways. Good people.

I am extremely honoured to say that I am one of those fortunate ones. I recently had a 7-day long experience that has definitively changed my life.

Starting at 8 AM on the 23rd of April to 2 PM on the 29th of April, I experienced what were probably the most relaxing, liberating and enlightening (roughly) 150 hours of my life so far. I’m being totally serious. Some of you who have read some of my previous posts, and especially the last one or two Coffee Updates, may have read about how I have enrolled in a two year long teacher training course on Yoga, at The Yoga Institute in Santacruz, Mumbai. Since it is an advanced course, it’s prerequisite is that all students must first complete the introductory 7-day camp. The 7-day camp is residential as well as non-residential, which means students can stay there at the hostel for the duration of the seven days, depending on the availability of beds, of course. It is meant to be done living there, to get the authentic experience. And that’s how I did it; I stayed there for 7 days.

It involves waking up early in the morning, doing exercises, or asanas, as Yoga calls it, and various other activities throughout the day, both physically and mentally stimulating, interspersed with wholesome, fresh, nutritious food at regular intervals. All of this not only rejuvenates your body, but it freshens your mind as well.

At this point, I have to admit that I was, at first, very apprehensive about doing this. Not in the ‘I-don’t-want-to-do-it’ way, because I knew I had to do it and I knew how good it would be for me if I let it. And that right there, is probably the thing. A part of me wasn’t letting the course be what it was meant to be. On the very first day itself, I was repeatedly reminded to open up my mind, let go, relax and enjoy. After what I learnt there, I realise that Yoga, as it is marketed in so many places around the world: loosening up your body, essentially becoming some sort of contortionist, is so badly interpreted. Yes, the physical side is an very important aspect, but to me at least, Yoga is more about the mind and being the master of it.

There were a few huge notions that I engineered into my mind while I was there, and these are the kind of notions that stick around.

The first one is of not judging people. There were about 57-58 of us taking part in the 7 Day Camp, out of which a good 30%-40% were from countries other than India. We’ve lived all our lives, being told to be wary of others, how the world’s a cruel place and whatnot. Some of the more skeptical people also tell us that the world’s become so shitty you can’t trust anybody. As we grow up, we also learn from experience and whenever we experience something of this kind, it sticks, because we’ve also been hearing so much of this kind from those close to us. Impressionable young minds. Classmates spreading rumours about you, having a fight with a friend about something you later realise was petty, having an experience of typically snobbish Government employees. This kind of stuff happens a lot in early life, and especially the first two. It all reaffirms our faith in what everybody tells us and how the world is basically a giant pisspot. What we don’t realise, though, is that it’s stuff like this that shapes our psyche, and ultimately our life.

Maybe the world is a giant pisspot. Depends on where you decide to stand. And that’s the second thing I learnt. I, and only I, have control over how I see things. If I see them from a negative light, then it’s only going to make me feel shittier about things. Not a single soul in the world would know. I control my state of mind, and Yoga is all about having a balanced state of mind.

I have always been a bit of a dumb perfectionist of sorts. I have wanted things to be a certain way, for them to turn out in a certain way. I have even wanted myself to be a certain kind of person. But that was a classical kind of punishing belief system that I had created. I even studied about it in Psychology class, but it never struck me. I guess epiphanies are like lightning in that way, they don’t strike unless there’s a thunderstorm. That brings me to the next thing I learnt. I have no box I need to fit into. There’s no hard-frame category I must be in, or a condition I must always be fulfilling. All I need to be doing is my duty, whatever it may be at that particular point in time. At 4 in the afternoon, for example, my duty is to go to the gym, because fitness is a duty to myself. Or at 6 AM three or four days a week, my duty is to go cycling with my sister. Once college begins, my duty would be to attend college from 7 AM to 12 PM 5 days a week. Every Wednesday though, I am allowed to watch The Flash for 45 minutes, since that constitutes recreation and that also is important.


That’s enough of me preaching, I guess. I’ll sign off while you guys are still tolerating me.

Just kidding, I’ve got some more epiphanies to rant on.

LOL, kidding. Again.

I’ll show myself out.

starts meditating