Your Mountain, Your Path

I have had a few thoughts about stuff, so bear with me as I try to compile them into a fairly sensible blog post. I might be incoherent at times, but trust me; there is a method to my madness. So here goes.

Bruce Wayne kicks off Batman v Superman by saying there were once ‘diamond absolutes’. I believe, in real life, there are none. There are no absolutes. It’s all variable and relative.

There’s a lot of idealism in most people’s upbringings, I suppose. I’d hate to generalize or speak for others, so I’m going to stick to me. I grew up with a lot of ideals being placed in front of me. I continue to grow with a similar buffet of ideals placed in front of me. “I must strive to be ‘x’ kind of a person”, “strive to achieve ‘x’, ‘y’ and ‘z’ things”, “look for ‘x’ kind of qualities in people I must accept as peers, friends, partners,” et cetera, et cetera.

Simon Sinek is a well known orator and in general, someone with great understanding of people, among, I’m sure, a lot of other things. There’s this one interview/speech of his where he talks about millennials, the why behind their troubles in life – faulty upbringing, skewed perceptions on life, low self esteem, lack of “grit”, and how society sees them. I am aware I’m not the typical prototype of a millennial, but I couldn’t help but relate to some things Simon says (see what I did there?).  

He says relationships are slow, uncomfortable, meandering, messy processes. He says, “I see young people these days standing at the foot of a mountain, with this abstract concept of ‘impact’ that they want to have in the world. What they don’t see is the mountain.”

The concept of this mountain is what I’m trying to get at here.

Its not wrong to have ideals like the ones I mentioned above. I have many of those ideals, and I’m sure many of you have a variation of them as well. They motivate us and keep us going. They give us somewhere to go. However, there’s some traveling to be done from where you are, to where that ideal is. There’s some climbing to be done, and there’s no one single path. I may walk 20 miles before falling into a ditch 10 feet deep, not coming out of it for a few weeks.

That’s how life is. There ain’t no map, no instruction manual. Each and every one of us is figuring it out as we go along. A different path, is not necessarily the wrong one.

I talk a lot about ‘moments’ and enjoying them, in a lot of my blog posts, but that’s because I believe in the process. I live for it. The ‘little innocuous moments’ as Sinek calls them, when you’re not doing anything, when you’re just sitting and looking around, observing, registering, and thinking. When ideas come and go, when people look at you like an idiot for not looking down at your phone or reading something and instead just gazing around. You’re not an idiot. In that moment, you’re human. And the great thing about that is that while you’re on a path to some esoteric land where you want to get to, you’re looking on each side, at the fields passing you by, the roads, the people, all the other mountains, the rain drops, everything. You’re looking, and that’s more than many of us can boast of having really, truly done today. So, look!

To not blindly walk, but appreciate the path others are on, while walking on my own path, is something I want to live by.

Writing’s Easy, Said Nobody Ever

At the expense of being very blunt, I’m going to say that writing can be very tough. Getting someone to read what you’ve written can be even tougher.

I don’t mean to disconcert those just starting out in this very competitive but equally rewarding field that demands you to be constantly spewing out word after word, page after page. Hell, I’m just starting out in this field too. And at first, this fact probably disconcerts all. I hope it does. You are constantly reminded that you need to find inspiration and put pen to paper (or fingers to keys, whichever works for you) and this, sort of prompt, pushes you to write. Fear isn’t bad until you allow it to be so.

However stupid or illogical it may sound, inspiration is everywhere. Not all of us find inspiration in the same things, people or places, obviously. Inspiration doesn’t necessarily have to mean complete ideas of what you should, must or want to write. That would just be plagiarism. No, inspiration can mean different things to different people. Two things that mesmerise and intrigue me to no extent are clouds and the sky, its hues, shades, the fact that it is basically endless. I find a lot of my ideas when I’m just staring away into the sky, admiring the patterns that the clouds make, some thin and wispy, others thick and bulbous.

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And that’s all well and good, but there are no local inspiration stores and at times it disappears as swiftly as it came to you. And that’s why you have to create inspiration. And that’s obviously easier said than done. I ain’t got no philosophy to that because it is as elusive to me as it is to you. Probably more.

Sometimes I catch myself backspacing a lot. Or scratching out what I just wrote, if I’m using pen and paper. And it’s not always because there was a mistake or I wrote a word in the wrong tense or anything. Its because there’s this little thing inside all of us called The Critic, whose job is conveniently described in his name. And he’s arguably the worst critic of all physically existent as well as non-existent critics. Trust me, he’s the worst. I can’t seem to emphasise that enough. I’ve been at the mercy of that critic for a long time but his words slowly mean less to me although they are always taken into consideration but never shown the way to the heart. We must all show this critic his place and keep him there.


Recently I’ve been a little off with all the fiction writing and all and I thought it was because I wasn’t giving it enough time or I didn’t have inspiration. I found out that, yes, I wasn’t giving it enough time but the inspiration was there all along. I even wrote down lots and lots of ideas down in my notebook or in the note-taking app I have. Why I couldn’t materialise that is a lot of factors actually: I was out holidaying and returned just before Christmas after which I had to complete pending college work while also studying for my tests (which just got over today (yayy)).

So, today I was just staring into the sky, because I have nothing to do for a few days now since college is temporarily closed for us 11th graders, and I got to thinking about why I’ve been writing relatively less fiction lately and I came up with this idea of sharing what I’ve learnt about writing over the short number of years I’ve been writing.

This is intended to be motivating and uplifting when you’re fishing for words to put on that blank page or generally when you’re looking down the barrel of another barren, wordless day. Or anytime, really. Reminding myself of these things definitely motivates me.

So, go write! 😀